What do you offer?

We offer both day and overnight experiences. We are able to offer most activities for both types of trips. When can I get there? When do we leave? We work with your busing and transportation schedule. Many day groups are able to arrive by 9:30 and leave by 1:30 due to busing. Some groups are able to stay for an evening program as well. Overnight groups often have similar timing, just with an overnight between. We have a conversation about your curriculum needs and transportation abilities and determine the best fit for your school on arrival and departure.

When can I get there? When do we leave?

We work with your busing and transportation schedule. Many day groups are able to arrive by 9:30 and leave by 1:30 due to busing. Some groups are able to stay for an evening program as well. Overnight groups often have similar timing, just with an overnight between. We have a conversation about your curriculum needs and transportation abilities and determine the best fit for your school on arrival and departure.

Can we do the Zipline?

The zipline, along with our high ropes course, is one of the few activities requiring an additional fee. Due to staffing needs and the nature of the activities, we need time to set up and run these activities. The zipline is able to accomodate roughly 15 people an hour and is highly individualized in nature. It is very fun, and more individually focused rather than group focused.

Can we go swimming?

Groups are welcome to request swimming as an activity for elective time, or as a “Polar Bear” option before breakfast. This requires scheduling lifeguard staff limiting the option at times.

What are your activities?

We offer several activities - or classes - to all ages. These activities are roughly split into four categories: Science, History/Civics, Social-Emotional Learning (Team-building) and Outdoor Skills. Science activitiesinvolve understanding of ecological concepts such as food chains, macroinvertebrate studies, and animal adaptations. For some overnight groups we are also able to introduce astronomy. In March, we also tap maple trees. Our science activities involve discussion, hands-on participation, and movement. History and civicsclasses place students in the shoes of pioneers, native Americans, and community members. Moving through activities pulled from the time period, children gain an empathetic understanding of the push/pull factors that affected early Americans. Students are also given opportunity to engage in mock debate about area resources such as lumber and water. A highlight of the camp experience is team and community building. Our staff work with groups to commit to completing several challenge initiatives - starting on our sports field and moving into our low ropes challenge course. We also have our high ropes course. Other activities engage students to practice communication skills and their own sense of mindfulness. Of course, the camp experience brings students to the great outdoors. We have a fun survival activity as well as two compass courses for students to complete. Students can also canoe, participate in archery, or take a break in the Gaga Pit. Teachers and Administrators work with our Camp Director to determine the academic and social gaps and other needs for their particular school.

How do meals work?

We are able to offer the option of hot meals in our classic camp Lodge. Meals are served family style and are available for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Camp staff facilitate service and instruct students in self-busing of tables. All meals include a vegetarian option, salad bar, and sandwich station. Our lodge is peanut free as well as offering both dairy and non-dairy milks. Our kitchen staff is happy to speak directly with teachers (and parents) with additional dietary need so all students feel welcome and full. Our Lodge has a two-week rotating menu, though schools are welcome to request specific meals. We also provide coffee and tea to adults as well as a fruit bowl for between class snacks.

Who works with our students?

Our instructional staff come from all over the country. All share a love of the outdoors, working with children, and experiential education. Typical instructors hold Bachelor’s degrees in science, history, or education and all undergo background checks and a rigorous interview process. We hold our instructors to high youth development and pedagogical standards.

What if it rains?

We pride ourselves on running our activities rain or shine. In the event of severe weather, we are able to adapt many activities to an indoor space. Students are encouraged to dress for the weather and come prepared to be outside in the current temperature and weather.

How does billing work?

After determining the best date for your group, you receive a contract with a deposit amount. This contract is signed by the school/district representative and returned to Pendalouan with the deposit. Groups provide Pendalouan with their final attendance (staff and chaperones) one school day before arriving. This attendance number is used for the final invoice which is provided upon arrival. School representatives then work with our Office Manager and their own financial departments to provide payment. Schools are welcome to request an invoice early.

Is there Wi-Fi?

We provide Wi-Fi in our main lodge and our Activity Center. Passwords are available upon request.

for day groups

How many chaperones do I need?

We suggest a 1:10 ratio chaperone:student for day groups. Additional parents are more than welcome to accompany your group. Keep in mind there is an additional rate for parents during meals of $5. When the chaperone ratio grows on the chaperone side, we find these extra parents can be distracting to the classes and activities. Your experience will be best if you are able to find the “just-right” ratio for your group.

Where do we keep our stuff?

Depending on availability, we encourage students to keep their backpacks and belongings with them throughout the day. When available, we are able to provide limited storage space for belongings in our Lodge and Classroom buildings.

for overnight groups

Where do we stay?

Our 16 cabins are all heated. They range in size from 8-16 bunks. Schools are assigned cabins based on group size and availability. Most cabins are rustic, with electricity. Students use community bathhouses with clean showers and hot water. Bunks have plastic mattresses.

Who stays in the cabins?

Schools provide their own overnight chaperones - teachers, parents, and high school counselors have all been used with great success. We recommend a ratio of 1:10 chaperone: student, or at least two chaperones per cabin. Schools are welcome to use their district’s recommendations. We will provide you with a cabin document for assigning sleeping quarters. After many, many groups, we find the suggested ratio to be the “best” as far as chaperones remaining engaged in the program.

What if there is an emergency?

Teachers are the first line of communication in an emergency. If needed, our Camp Director lives on site and is able to provide assistance when necessary. Our Emergency Action Plan posted in our main lodge.

What do we do at night?

After dinner, groups select two evening activities such as Capture the Flag or a Campfire. These activities are provided on our curriculum guide. We also provide a snack for groups before sending them off to bed.